Last edited by Tujora
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Anglo-Saxon landscape found in the catalog.

The Anglo-Saxon landscape

the kingdom of the Hwicce

by Della Hooke

  • 336 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Manchester University Press in Manchester (Greater Manchester), Dover, N.H., USA .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain,
  • West Midlands (England),
  • England,
  • West Midlands.
    • Subjects:
    • Anglo-Saxons -- England -- West Midlands,
    • Ethnology -- England -- West Midlands,
    • Hwicce,
    • Great Britain -- History -- Anglo-Saxon period, 449-1066,
    • West Midlands (England) -- History

    • Edition Notes

      StatementDella Hooke.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDA152 .H665 1985
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 270 p., [4] leaves of plates :
      Number of Pages270
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2854717M
      ISBN 10071901736X
      LC Control Number84017181

      Ranging from the earliest settlement period through to the urban expansion of late Anglo-Saxon England, this book draws on evidence from place-names, written sources, and the landscape itself to provide fresh insights into the topic.   The book rightly emphasises that much of the Anglo-Saxon landscape was carefully managed. However, it is important to remember that even managed woodland could support wildlife. Wild animals increasingly feature not only in discussions about hunting, but also more generally in the characterisation of both pagan and Christian worlds, and the Author: Grenville Astill.

      Her book Trees in Anglo-Saxon England complements the earlier collection From Earth to Art: The Many Aspects of the Plant-World in Anglo-Saxon England (), to which Hooke contributed. The book examines in detail the evidence for real trees in Anglo-Saxon England and speculates on their spiritual and symbolic dimensions.   Amsterdam University Press has started a book series devoted to Environmental Humanities in Pre-modern Cultures. The first book in the series is just out: Anglo-Saxon Literary Landscapes: Ecotheory and the Environmental Imagination by Heide Estes. "Literary scholars have traditionally understood landscapes, whether natural or manmade, as metaphors for .

      This book examines how Anglo-Saxon communities perceived and used prehistoric monuments across the period AD – Using a range of sources including archaeological, historical, art historical, and literary, the variety of ways in which the early medieval population of England used the prehistoric legacy in the landscape is explored from temporal and geographic : Sarah Semple.   "A magisterial work. Blair provides a compelling, integrated survey of Anglo-Saxon settlement, habitation, architecture, landscape design, and urban design. An impressive book of sweeping coverage, Building Anglo-Saxon England will /5(18).


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The Anglo-Saxon landscape by Della Hooke Download PDF EPUB FB2

Blair provides a compelling, integrated survey of Anglo-Saxon settlement, habitation, architecture, landscape design, and urban design. An impressive book of sweeping coverage, Building Anglo-Saxon England will undoubtedly become the standard work in the field."—Richard Gameson, author of The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon Church.

Blair provides a compelling, integrated survey of Anglo-Saxon settlement, habitation, architecture, landscape design, and urban design. An impressive book of sweeping coverage, Building Anglo-Saxon England will undoubtedly become the standard work in the field."―Richard Gameson, author of The Role of Art in the Late Anglo-Saxon ChurchCited by: 4.

The landscape of pre-Conquest England can often be reconstructed in minute detail. Yet this is one of the first attempts at such a project. Here the evidence is examined for the West Midlands – the counties of Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire, much of which formed the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the by: The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain is the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England from Romano-British to Germanic.

The Germanic-speakers in Britain, themselves of diverse origins, eventually developed a common cultural identity as process occurred from the mid-fifth to early seventh centuries, following the end.

Book Description: Traditional opinion has perceived the Anglo-Saxons as creating an entirely new landscape from scratch in the fifth and sixth centuries AD, cutting down woodland, and bringing with them the practice of open field agriculture, and establishing villages.

United Kingdom - United Kingdom - Anglo-Saxon England: Although Germanic foederati, allies of Roman and post-Roman authorities, had settled in England in the 4th century ce, tribal migrations into Britain began about the middle of the 5th century.

The first arrivals, according to the 6th-century British writer Gildas, were invited by a British king to defend his kingdom against the. Sense of Place in Anglo- Saxon England (), moved place- name studies beyond landscape and lordship to the dynamics of.

doing things: the multifarious agrarian, craft, and commercial activities in the landscape indicated by elements such as -wīc, or by ‘functional -tūn’ compounds such as Drayton, Charlton, or Eaton. These newFile Size: 4MB.

Book Description: The landscape of modern England still bears the imprint of its Anglo-Saxon past. Villages and towns, fields, woods and forests, parishes and shires, all shed light on the enduring impact of the Anglo-Saxons.

landscape in Old English and Anglo-Latin texts, it is essential to have an idea about what sort of landscape Anglo-Saxon authors and scribes actually lived in. The landscapes of England varied considerably across different regions and there is good evidence that the uses of Author: Heide Estes.

Signals of Belief in Early England: Anglo-Saxon Paganism Revisited is an academic anthology edited by the British archaeologists Martin Carver, Alex Sanmark and Sarah Semple which was first published by Oxbow Books in Containing nine separate papers produced by various scholars working in the fields of Anglo-Saxon archaeology and Anglo-Saxon history, the book Author: Martin Carver, Alex Sanmark, and.

Trees in Anglo-saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape (Anglo-saxon Studies) by Hooke, Della and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Further into the book, we find good assimilation of archaeological data from the last 30 or 40 years, enabling her to suggest that the Anglo-Saxon Fenland was not an empty land.

There was considerable continuity of occupation from the Romano- British period onwards, and some evidence to suggest that much of Fenland was well utilised and settled Author: Kathryn Krakowka.

One of the first attempts at reconstructing the landscape of pre-Conquest England in minute detail, this book is now available in paperback for the first time. Here the evidence is examined for the West Midlands - the counties of Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire, much of which formed the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the Hwicce/5(7).

The Anglo-Saxon Plough: A Detail of the Wheels - David Hill 'In the Sweat of thy Brow Shalt thou eat Bread': Cereals and Cereal Production in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape - Debby Banham The Early Christian Landscape of East Anglia - Richard Hoggett The Landscape and Economy of the Anglo-Saxon Coast: New Archaeological Evidence - Peter MurphyPages: The principal aim of this book is to assess Anglo-Saxon charters from a 'literary' point of view.

In the ninth century, a new and highly complex Latin style started to appear in Anglo-Saxon charters: rather than writing traditional, straightforward legal language, the authors of these documents turned to their Anglo-Saxon literary heritage for.

This book concerns the landscape that surrounded early medieval man, often described as he saw and experienced it. The Anglo-Saxon period was one of considerable change in settlement and land use patterns but the landscape regions that emerge, documented for the first time in history, are still familiar to us today.

The image conjured up, and for the present it can hardly. Farming was the basis of the wealth that made England worth invading, twice, in the eleventh century.

This book uses a wide range of evidence to investigate how Anglo-Saxon farmers produced the food and other agricultural products that sustained English economy, society and culture before the Norman Conquest. Part one draws on written and pictorial sources, Author: Debby Banham.

Part II Trees and Woodland in the Anglo-Saxon Landscape. Chapter 5 The Nature and Distribution of Anglo-Saxon Woodland Chapter 6 The Use of Anglo-Saxon Woodland: Place-Name and Charter Evidence Chapter 7 Trees in the Landscape Part III Individual Tree Species in Anglo-Saxon England.

Chapter 8 Trees of Wood-Pasture and 'Ancient Author: Della Hooke. Get this from a library. Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: literature, lore and landscape. [Della Hooke] -- "Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

But. Trees in Anglo-Saxon England: Literature, Lore and Landscape Della Hooke Trees played a particularly important part in the rural economy of Anglo-Saxon England, both for wood and timber and as a wood-pasture resource, with hunting gaining a growing cultural role.

The conversion to Christianity of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of East Anglia left huge marks on the area, both metaphorical and literal. Drawing on both the surviving documentary sources, and on the eastern region's rich archaeological record, this book presents the first multi-disciplinary synthesis of the process.

It begins with an analysis of the historical framework, followed by an. This wide-ranging book explores both the "real", But they are also powerful icons in many pre-Christian religions, with a degree of tree symbolism found in Christian scripture too.

This wide-ranging book explores both the "real", historical and archaeological evidence of trees and woodland, and as they are depicted in Anglo-Saxon literature and /5.ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: VII, Seiten Karten, Illustrationen: Contents: Trees and groves in pre-Christian beliefChristianity and the sacred treeTrees in literatureTrees, mythology and national consciousness: into the futureThe nature and distribution of Anglo-Saxon woodlandThe use of Anglo-Saxon woodland: place .